MLC Windows

MLC Windows

Windows Glossary

Argon Gas:
injected between layers of glass to increase the insulation value of the window. Argon gas has no smell or color, and is heavier than oxygen.
Awning Window:
awning window is perfect for many architectural styles, and it looks intriguing when grouped with other window types. It is hinged at the top and opens out from the bottom in an upward swing.
Balance:
the mechanism that holds up sash units on single and double hung windows. It also helps control the force needed to raise and lower sash.
Bay Window:
A bay window is composed of three or more individual units. The center unit is parallel to the exterior wall with side or flanking units aligned at 30 or 45 degree angles.
Bow Window:
Bow windows subtly increase interior spaces by extending outward to create the illusion of a rounded exterior wall. A bow window consists of a series of four or more (commonly five) adjoining windows units that are installed on a radius from the wall of the building.
Casement Window:
A casement window perfectly complements the simplicity of modern design. This type of window is hinged on either side so that the sash opens outward, to the right or left, in a swinging motion.
Casing:
decorative trim around interior frame of window.
Crank Handle:
opening mechanism for the casement and awning window.
Double Hung Window:
a window in which both the top and bottom sash move up and down.
Egress:
the size opening a window creates for access.
Fixed/Picture Window:
a window with no moving parts or sashes.
Grilles/Muntins:
decorative window dividers installed on the exterior or interior of the window or sandwiched between the glass. Offered in variable widths.
Jamb:
vertical members of the window frame.
Low-E:
stands for “low emissivity.” Low-E coating on a window pane lets light in, yet reflects heat and keeps harmful UV rays out in the summer and keeps heat inside during the winter.
Mulled:
the way windows are attached together to create a combination.
NFRC Rating:
National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC) provides unbiased energy performance ratings for windows, doors and skylights. Independent NFRC ratings provide the basis for the Energy Star’s® window performance requirements.
Rough Opening:
framed opening in wall in which a window is installed.
R-Value:
marks a window’s resistance to heat loss or gain. The higher the R-value, the better the window reduces heating and cooling bills.
Sill:
the horizontal piece forming the bottom of the window frame.
Single Hung Window:
A single-hung window provides a classic appearance to any home. It features a stationary top sash and a bottom sash that slides vertically. Sash tilts in for convenient cleaning.
Spacer:
material along the perimeter of the sash, sandwiched between two pieces of glass.
Tempered Glass:
type of glass that, when broken, shatters into small pieces to protect you from injury.
Thermal Break:
part of a window or door that reduces transfer of cold or heat from one surface to another.
UV (Ultraviolet) Rays:
the rays of the sun that can filter through windows and heat up a room, as well as fade furniture, rugs, etc.
U-Value:
the amount of heat entering or escaping through a window. The lower the U-value, the better the insulation value.

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